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Article: 5 Things to Know about the National Eucharistic Pilgrimage’s stop in Maryland



May 29, 2024

The Catholic Review (Original Link)


What is the National Eucharistic Pilgrimage?

The National Eucharistic Pilgrimage is a prelude to the National Eucharistic Congress, which expects to bring together tens of thousands of Catholics July 17-21 in Indianapolis’ Lucas Oil Stadium for worship, speakers and Eucharist-centered events. The pilgrimage and the congress are part of the National Eucharistic Revival, a three-year initiative of the U.S. Catholic bishops that began in 2022 with the aim of deepening Catholics’ love for the Eucharist.


On May 18 and 19, four groups of eight to 10 people each set off from San Francisco (Serra Route); New Haven, Conn. (Saint Seton Route); San Juan, Texas (Saint Juan Diego Route); and Minnesota (Marian Route) to carry the Eucharist into cities and towns along the way. 

The pilgrims travel often on foot, processing with a monstrance containing the Blessed Sacrament. 


Together, they’ll cover more than 6,500 miles over 27 states and 65 dioceses. The pilgrimage’s four groups of Perpetual Pilgrims are young adults ages 19-29 selected in an application process to travel the full length of each route.


What is the main local tie to the national event?


The eastern route, which the Maryland stop is part of, is named for St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first American-born saint. St. Seton has major ties to two of the stops, Emmitsburg and Baltimore.


Mother Seton is considered the matriarch of Catholic schools in the United States, having established one of first girls Catholic school in the nation in Emmitsburg with the help of the Sulpician Fathers, who were based at St. Mary’s Seminary on Paca Street in Baltimore.


She also founded the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph as the first community for religious women established in the United States.


Canonized Sept. 14, 1975 by Pope St. Paul VI, her remains are entombed in Emmitsburg. She is the patron saint of Catholic schools, widows and Catholic converts.


The stop in Baltimore calls attention to the city that is the seat of the nation’s first archdiocese with a stop at the United States’ first cathedral, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary on Cathedral Street.


What is the schedule for the stop in the Archdiocese of Baltimore?


The pilgrimage will make its first stop in Westminster, followed by stops in Emmitsburg and Baltimore.


Here is a full look at the schedule:

  • June 5, St. John, 43 Monroe Street, Westminster – 2.2-mile Eucharistic procession, 5-6:30 p.m., followed by a cookout, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (free-will donation)

  • June 6, Seton Shrine, 339 S. Seton Ave, Emmitsburg – Mass with Archbishop William E. Lori, 8:30 a.m.; 1.4-mile procession, 9:30; lunch, noon (available for purchase); 3.5-mile Walk in Footsteps of Mother Seton to Lourdes Grotto, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

  • June 6, Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles Street – Vespers and Eucharistic preaching by Father Leo Patalinghug, 6 p.m.; Plating Grace Food Truck (pre-purchase meal tickets online), 6:45-8 p.m.

  • June 7, Basilica of the Assumption, 409 Cathedral Street, Baltimore – Mass with Archbishop Lori, 8:30 a.m.; 0.7-mile solemn procession to St. Mary’s Historic Site (600 N. Paca Street), 9:30 a.m.

  • June 7, 4.9-mile walk from Our Daily Bread to Patterson Park, 1-4:30 p.m., followed by vespers, benediction and a festival.


How can people get involved?


You can simply attend any of the local events or, if you want to get more involved, volunteers are needed.


To register to attend, visit and see more information, visit: Overview ⋮ Seton Route – Archdiocese of Baltimore.


To volunteer for the Baltimore events, contact Angelus Virata at angelus.virata@archbalt.org.


The National Eucharistic Congress’ perpetual pilgrims are accepting prayer requests in person and at https://tinyurl.com/NEP-prayers


Where does it go from here?


After the festival at Patterson Park on June 7, the pilgrimage departs for the Archdiocese of Washington on its journey to Indianapolis. 


The four pilgrimage groups are scheduled to arrive in Indianapolis July 16. 


OSV News contributed to this story.

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